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Find out what's happening in the blog. Below is a list of blog items.

Jun 26

Updated Draft Community Climate Action Plan 2.0 Coming July 2020

Posted to Climate Connection by Samantha Roberts

Updated Draft Community Climate Action Plan 2.0 Coming July 2020



After 2.5 years of community engagement and research, the City of Eugene is poised to publish the community’s updated climate action plan, or CAP2.0.  The draft of this Plan was initially released in November 2019 and has since been updated with guidance from the Mayor’s CRO Ad Hoc Work Group. The CAP 2.0 is the update from Eugene's 2010 Climate and Energy Action Plan.

A unique plan that focuses on agency and partner commitments, the CAP 2.0 identifies high impact practices among community partners that have larger, system level impacts. The Plan also elevates the concerns of frontline communities who are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Utilizing input from a diverse range of community partners, this Plan represents the voice and aspirations of the community as we work together to reduce our emissions and achieve the climate goals set forth by the Climate Recovery Ordinance.

City Council will hear from staff about the CAP 2.0 process and document starting in July.  Here is a list of upcoming dates as City Council works towards approval of the CAP2.0:

  • Early July - Release updated CAP2.0 document
  • July 8 - CAP2.0 Work Session
  • July 13 - Public Forum
  • July 15- CAP 2.0 Work Session
  • July 27 -Public Forum
  • July 29 – CAP 2.0 Work Session

For more information about the CAP2.0 including the document’s history and process to date, please visit https://www.eugene-or.gov/4284/Climate-Action-Plan-20.


Jul 10

July 10, 2020

Posted to Keeping in touch: Notes from the Mayor by Nicole Bernstein

Council, staff and I continue to try to balance to the urgency of demands to address racial justice and police reform with the ongoing policy decisions before us.  We face four concurrent crises: homelessness, climate change, the pandemic, and racial justice.  They are interrelated.  All are equity issues and all require both immediate action and sustained commitment to implement structural change in our city, county, state and nation.

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Apr 17

Hitting the Jackpot with Hall's Aster

Posted to Parks Pulse by Elissa Gavette

The hard work and patience of the Native Plant Nursery staff and volunteers has paid off, literally. A key plant for restoration sites, Hall's Aster plays an important role in providing late season nectar and pollen to bees. But propagating this precious plant doesn’t come easy, which is why it’s worth $1,000 a pound. This season, the Native Plant Nursery yielded 10 pounds, valued at $10,000!

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May 29

The Best Things We've Seen This Week - Vol. 11

Posted to Rec News & Stories by Benjamin Schorzman

Welcome to The Best Things We’ve Seen This Week – Vol. 11. 

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Oct 25

New Public Piano Downtown

Posted to What's Happening Downtown? by Sarah-Kate Sharkey

Light Up the World Public Piano
A new piece of playable art is on its way to downtown Eugene!

The donated piano will be painted on the first floor of the Atrium building and then installed in the Park Blocks for the Nov. 17 Light Up Downtown tree lighting event. The piano will be available for the public to play through mid-December.

Local artist David Placencia will use a unique bubble paint technique to transform the piano into a work of art. His theme is “Light Up the World: A New Time of Unity”, and his design features colorful ribbons spiraling from an oval Mayan calendar. The public is invited to watch him at work on the first floor of the Atrium building (10th and Olive) from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, 3, 6 and 13. Examples of Placencia’s past work can be seen at khaostasis.com.

The piano will be the City of Eugene's third piece of playable public art this year. The first two pianos, stationed this past summer outside the Downtown Public Library and the Hult Center for the Performing Arts, were extensively enjoyed by musicians and audiences. Both pianos currently reside in Eugene Rec community centers to delight patrons during the rainy months.

The playable art program gives musicians the opportunity to share their talents and the public the chance to enjoy live music in a non-traditional setting. The pianos also serve as temporary works of public art, painted and collaged by talented local artists chosen to bring more color to downtown’s core. Similar programs exist in many cities throughout the country. For information about the Portland program, visit pianopushplay.com.