Data-Driven Roadmap for Climate Action

CAP2.0 - Data-Driven Roadmap for Climate Action

One goal of the CAP2.0 process was to recognize what additional actions would be needed to reach the CRO emission goals after evaluating the actions that have already been committed to being implemented. To accomplish this goal the CAP2.0 process focused on understanding what actions the ECC Partners had committed to completing over the next 5-10 years, measuring the impact of those actions, and comparing that analysis to the CRO emission goals. Further detail on the ECC Partner actions can be found in Sections 5 and 6 and in Appendix 3.

Figure 1

Multiple ways Eugene tracks progress towards the Climate Recovery Ordinance goals.

Figure 1 shows multiple ways Eugene tracks progress towards the CRO goals:


  • The smallest circle shows Eugene’s fossil fuel use. 
  • The middle circle shows Eugene’s sector-based inventory – a method that measures locally produced emissions using a sector-based inventory. This circle encompasses fossil fuel use because all emissions emitted from fossil fuels in Eugene contribute to local emissions. 
  • The largest circle shows Eugene’s consumption-based inventory.

This method accounts for locally produced emissions and emissions created somewhere else in order to produce goods and services consumed locally. This circle includes all emissions from fossil fuel use and other sources of local emissions.


Figure 2: Sector-based (local) emissions and existing policy waterfall graph

Emissions produced locally each year are forecasted to reach 1.15 Million MTCO2e by 2030 if the comm

Emissions produced locally each year are forecasted to reach 1.15 Million MTCO2e by 2030 if the community continues its current trajectory.


Figure 2 illustrates that ECC Partner actions will lead to local reductions of about 320,000 MTCO2e.


Figure 3: Consumption-based emissions and existing policy forecast waterfall graph

Emissions are forecasted to reach 3.13 Million MTCO2e by 2030 if the community continues with its cu

Emissions are forecasted to reach 3.13 Million MTCO2e by 2030 if the community continues with its current growth and consumption patterns. For more details on the calculations and assumptions on figures 2 and 3 please see Appendix 1.


Figure 3 illustrates that ECC Partner actions will lead to local reductions of about 700,000 MTCO2e.



COE-EugeneGreenhouseGas_7


Community emissions can be modeled using three “buckets” to represent the primary sources: energy used in buildings, transportation fuels, and consumption.


  1. Energy Used In Buildings 
    This bucket contains the emissions associated primarily with electricity and natural gas used to heat and cool our homes, businesses, and stores in Eugene.

  2. Transportation Fuels 
    This bucket contains emissions primarily from the combustion of gasoline and diesel fuels used in vehicles in Eugene.
  3. Consumption
    This bucket contains all the emissions that come from the manufacturing and transportation of goods and services to Eugene, and the emissions from disposing of goods once they have been used.


Local policy can have the most impact on transportation fuels and energy used in buildings. While local actions can reduce emissions from the consumption bucket, actions are needed from all levels of government and other sectors to make substantial reductions. The strategics described in the remainder of this document are related to local emissions.